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Full text of "Scutari : the Bosphorus and the Crimea. Twenty four sketches"

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TWENTY FOUR SKETCHES. 

-)Y kLAUY Mil' I A BLAf JDVM)j;]) 

IN AID OF THE FOLLOWING. 

THE IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS. 

THE MORAVIAN CHURCH MISSIONS. 

THE VAUDOIS SCHOOLS. 

THE TURKISH MISSIONS. 

TO® VilUUifiliES, (Price Two Guineas) 



VENTNOR.ISLE OF WIGHT. 
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TO MISS FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE. 



My deab Miss Nightingale, 

These Sketches, though simple and without artistic pretension, are yet true and faithful 
delineations, of some deeply-interesting localities with which we have both been so singularly connected. And 
in dedicating, by your kind permission, such trifles to you, I desire in perfect truth also to record that, amid 
the undying and thrilling associations of our Oriental campaign, the gentle, serene and never-failing kindness 
experienced by myself from you, must always remain as a bright and sunny memory with your obliged and 
affectionately attached 

ALICIA BLACKWOOD. 

Ventnob, January, 1857. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE PLATES. 



FRONTISPIECE. 

THE FRONTISPIECE presents the grave of the eight Officers of the Coldstream Guards who fell in the 
Rattle of Inkerman, and were buried on the spot. Their bodies were afterwards exhumed and removed t>> 
Cathcart'a Hill, where a tombstone records all their names, as represented in the vignette. Though not removed 
until March 1856, the bodies were in such preservation that each was easily recognised. The Russian words 
on the tombstone signify, " Resvect the Tombs of Brave Warriors. 

I. 
THE CASTLE HOSPITAL AT BALACLAVA, taken from the Sardinian Hospital. A little square spot 
on the hill in the distance, beyond the Harbour, marks the Naval Burying-ground, where is laid the body of 
Admiral Boxer. This chain of huts, used for the purpose of an Hospital, derives its name from the old Genoese 

C:isilr crowning the hill, and now in ruins. 

II. & III. 
THE BAY AND MONASTERY OF ST. GEORGE, with Balaclava Bay in the distance. Behind the 
Monastery, to the right, some huts are visible, which constituted our Convalescent Hospital. The Monastery 
itself, though sheltered by being about fifty feet below the surface of the cliff, is several hundred feet above the 
level of the sea. The position is grand; and, as it has a southern aspect, the spot is very cheering 

IV. 
SEBASTOPOL FROM THE REDAN; taken at the period when it was in complete ruin; Fort Nicholas 
and Fort Paul having been blown up, and the whole place destroyed. The large white building to the right 
is the Barrack. The distant Fort on the opposite side of the Bay. stretching out to the sea, is Fort Constantine. 

V. 
FORT CATHARINE, on the north side of Sebastopol, taken from the earth-work between il and Fort 
Constantine; and looking up the Harbour towards Inkerman. 

VI. & VII. 
A panoramic view of THE VALLEYS OF INKERMAN AND TCHERNAYA, from the Inkerman 
Agueduot. To the left are the caves, ruins, and Greek chapel of Inkerman. To the right is the River 
Tchernoya, running through the valley toward the Trakter Bridge. The celebrated Spur battery was on the 
second of the high Promontories which command the valley. 

VIII. 

A RUSSIAN ENCAMPMENT ON THE RIVER BALBEC, between the Mackenzie heights and Baktchiserai 
The huts, if they can be so called, of the Russians, were chiefly excavations in the earth, covered over with wattles 
and mud. They appeared to be indescribably wretched and dirty. 

IX. 

BAKTCHISERAI, from the hill overlooking the town, and which is used as a Tartar Cemetery. In the 
extreme distance is the singular village of Tchoufout Kaleh, on the top of the lofty rock; beneath which, to 
the right, some trees designate the Valley of Jehosaphat, where the Karaite Jews bury their dead. 

X. 

THE COURT-YARD AND PALACE OF THE KHANS AT BAKTCHISERAI. now used as a Russian 
Hospital. This building is said to be of purely Tartar style, which is something between the Chinese and 
the Turkish as now seen at Constantinople. The colorings are very bright, and the whole effect is pleasing. 

XI. 
THE GREEK MONASTERY OF THE ASSUMPTION, singularly situated like a nest in a rock, in 
the high cliff to the right, in the ravine leading from Baktchiserai. In the foreground is our encampment, with 
Miss Nightingale's Bulgarian carriage, mules, &c. On the rock behind this Monastery, colossal figures of the 
twelve apostles are painted in brilliant colors and gold. 

XII. 
TCHOUFOUT KALEH, the singular dwelling-place of the Karaite dews, on the top of the rock, where 
there is still a synagogue, and habitations for several hundreds of people. Tins view is taken from the road 
i i Man gush, which had been fortified by the Russians; and the remains of earth-works, gabions, &o., were still 
numerous in May 1850. 







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